Examples of online dating impersonation

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Examples of online impersonation include using the other person's name and personal information to create an email account or an account on a social network site such as Facebook.Examples of actions that might violate the new law include, but are not limited to, the following: Misdemeanor Penalties A violation of PC 528.5 is classified as a misdemeanor and comes with the potential for a fine of up to

Examples of online impersonation include using the other person's name and personal information to create an email account or an account on a social network site such as Facebook.Examples of actions that might violate the new law include, but are not limited to, the following: Misdemeanor Penalties A violation of PC 528.5 is classified as a misdemeanor and comes with the potential for a fine of up to $1,000 and/or up to a year in county jail.The intent of the law is to provide a 21st Century update to an 1872 law that outlaws impersonation.The new law concerns the online impersonation of someone else with the intent to defraud, threaten, intimidate, or in some way harm the other person.The fabricated life stories and photographs that they cobble together online often contain the experiences, friends, resumes and job titles that they wish were their own, providing a complete window into how these scammers want the world to see them - and how far they fall from those ideals.The emergence of such elaborate social schemes online was brought to light in a shocking way in the 2010 documentary 'Catfish,' in which 28-year-old Nev Schulman fell in love with a gorgeous young woman's Facebook profile and her voice over the phone - both of which turned out to belong to a middle-aged wife and mother.Meanwhile, thousands of people looking for celebrities on Twitter are finding it hard to work out who is real, so they turn to Jonathan Ross for help – because he seems strangely willing to phone up the celeb in question and just ask them, before posting his findings. Facebook won't let you impersonate anyone; Twitter won't let you impersonate anyone else unless it's a parody (although it's by no means guaranteed they'll get the joke).What isn't funny is when people without any legal resources find themselves under fire.

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Examples of online impersonation include using the other person's name and personal information to create an email account or an account on a social network site such as Facebook.

Examples of actions that might violate the new law include, but are not limited to, the following: Misdemeanor Penalties A violation of PC 528.5 is classified as a misdemeanor and comes with the potential for a fine of up to $1,000 and/or up to a year in county jail.

,000 and/or up to a year in county jail.The intent of the law is to provide a 21st Century update to an 1872 law that outlaws impersonation.The new law concerns the online impersonation of someone else with the intent to defraud, threaten, intimidate, or in some way harm the other person.The fabricated life stories and photographs that they cobble together online often contain the experiences, friends, resumes and job titles that they wish were their own, providing a complete window into how these scammers want the world to see them - and how far they fall from those ideals.The emergence of such elaborate social schemes online was brought to light in a shocking way in the 2010 documentary 'Catfish,' in which 28-year-old Nev Schulman fell in love with a gorgeous young woman's Facebook profile and her voice over the phone - both of which turned out to belong to a middle-aged wife and mother.Meanwhile, thousands of people looking for celebrities on Twitter are finding it hard to work out who is real, so they turn to Jonathan Ross for help – because he seems strangely willing to phone up the celeb in question and just ask them, before posting his findings. Facebook won't let you impersonate anyone; Twitter won't let you impersonate anyone else unless it's a parody (although it's by no means guaranteed they'll get the joke).What isn't funny is when people without any legal resources find themselves under fire.

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As the debate of how far authorities should go in policing people's behaviour on the internet continues, new Crown Prosecution guidelines mean such activity could amount to an offence such as grossly offensive communication or harassment, the Press Association reports.Civil Remedies Significantly, the new law also provides victims of malicious online impersonation the ability to file a civil claim against the impersonator to seek compensatory damages and other remedies.Free and Confidential Consultation The frequency of internet related violations is increasing as more people access the web and new laws define what is acceptable and unacceptable behavior.But as the use of social networks expands, any organisation or person in the public eye risks being impersonated; often badly, granted.And it's virtually impossible for them to take preventive measures.A distressed reader discovered herself on Facebook, and strongly suspects that her ex-boyfriend set up the profile.

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